Childrens homes: Statutory guidance and regulations

Introduction to children's homes

This guide explains in detail what a children’s home is and what the law says. 

 

The Children’s Homes (England) Regulations 

These Regulations introduce a new (2015) regulatory framework for children’s homes – one no longer focused on minimum standards and detailed processes but on aspirational quality standards (“the Quality Standards”) which are underpinned by requirements that homes must achieve to meet each Quality Standard. The aim is to drive up the quality of care in children’s homes, ensuring professionals working with the children in their care, tailor support to their individual needs and that the care provided is firmly centered on achieving high expectations and positive outcomes for each child. 

 

Guidance to the: Children’s homes regulations

Statutory guidance for those providing residential children’s homes for vulnerable children including the quality standards. This guide accompanies the Children’s Homes (England) Regulations 2015. It provides further explanation and information for everyone providing residential child care. The Regulations include Quality Standards which set out the aspirational and positive outcomes that we expect homes to achieve. They also set out the underpinning requirements that homes must meet in order to achieve those overarching outcomes.

 

Provision of accommodation for 16 and 17-year-olds who may be homeless and/or require accommodation.

Statutory guidance to children’s services authorities and local housing authorities about their duties under Part 3 of the Children Act 1989 and Part 7 of the Housing Act 1996 to secure or provide accommodation for homeless 16 and 17-year-old young people who may be homeless and/or require accommodation. This guidance has been issued jointly by the Secretary of State for Education and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government. It revises the guidance that was issued in April 2010. The guidance sets out the respective duties of children’s services and housing services to secure or provide accommodation for 16 and 17-year-old children who are homeless or in need of accommodation. The guidance was originally issued following the judgment by the House of Lords in the case of R (G) v London Borough of Southwark (2009). It has now been updated to reflect changes in homelessness and children’s legislation.

 

Securing sufficient accommodation for looked-after children.

Statutory guidance on securing sufficient accommodation and access to services for looked-after children. It sets out the approach that local authorities should take to make sure that looked-after children under their care have access to a sufficient range of accommodation, services and support.

 

 

Statutory guidance and regulations are updated as the Acts of parliament upon which they are based are amended (revised). The pdfs we reproduce here may not be the latest versions (they are included only to integrate the material into the site as a whole). The hyperlinks are the latest versions;

 

 

 

 

commentary

 

Also of interest in this series;

 

Statutory guidance Children Act 1989: Children's homes

** This publication was withdrawn on 6 March 2015 ** This has been replaced by Children’s homes regulations

 

Guidance Children’s homes regulations amendments 2014

Departmental advice for children’s homes providers and their partners following amendments to the Children’s Homes Regulations 2001. This advice follows amendments to the Children’s Homes Regulations 2001, which came into effect in January and April 2014. It includes information on: (i) location assessment. (ii) independent monitoring visits under regulation 33. (iii) relevant qualifications for care staff working in children’s homes.

 

Guidance Children’s homes: procedure for disclosing names and addresses.

In response to concerns about children’s privacy and confidentiality, the Department for Education has published this document concerning the use, storage and sharing of information. It sets out the legal context for disclosure of that information by Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector for Education, Children’s Services and Skills to: (i) local authorities (ii) the police (iii) the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (iv) the Secretary of State for Education. It also sets out the practical arrangements and expectations about the disclosure and use of that information by those authorities.

 

Guidance Placement of looked-after children in EU member states

From 31 January 2020 the UK will no longer be a member of the EU. However, this advice document is still relevant as the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 has converted Brussels IIa into domestic law for the duration of the transition period. Therefore, this advice document remains applicable until the end of the transition period, and local authorities should follow this process when dealing with requests from authorities in other EU member states to place a child into a children’s home or with a foster carer within their area. 

 

Social care common inspection framework (SCCIF): children’s homes

Guidance about how children’s homes are inspected, for use from November 2019. 

 

Statutory guidance and regulations are updated as the Acts of parliament upon which they are based are amended (revised). The pdfs we reproduce here may not be the latest versions (they are included only to integrate the material into the site as a whole). The hyperlinks are the latest versions;

 

 

 

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Crown copyright material is reproduced here under the Open Government Licence for public sector information.

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